Tag Archives: quality-assurance

May QASIG Video – Performance and Security Quality Practices in Continuous Delivery

Performance and Security Quality Practices in Continuous Delivery

presented by Khan Klatt, Director of Engineering at McGraw-Hill Engineering

Modern software engineering practices have challenged traditional thinking around the delivery of quality software. Waterfall practices have been eclipsed by agile practices, reducing cycle time to deliver software features from quarters or years to weeks or months. Agile practices are now being challenged by lean practices, which some organizations have exploited to reduce that cycle time from weeks/months to days/hours. In this talk, discover how decades-old quality practice and modern software engineering capabilities can be applied to deliver high-quality software on ultra-agile timeframes.

About our speaker: Khan Klatt is a Director of Engineering at McGraw-Hill Engineering, leading the company’s Continuous Integration/Continuous Delivery strategy. Khan joined McGraw-Hill Education in 2014, previously having worked in entertainment/gaming and social media startups local to Seattle. Khan built high-performance, highly-scalable APIs used by television game shows, web scraping/crawling, and content ranking algorithms, as well as a social media platform that scaled to 50M users in the early 2000’s. In the 1990s, Khan also helped co-found a Web consulting business and successfully built and sold a regional startup Internet Service Provider to a national ISP.

Khan attended Western Washington University in Bellingham, WA, where he served as the first Webmaster for that organization in 1993. His passion for progressive innovation was demonstrated in his work to integrate make the Campus-Wide Information System database available on the Web as early as 1994.

Khan came to the United States from Ankara, Turkey, where he attended grades K-12 in a Department of Defense Dependents School. Born in Turkey, Khan speaks Turkish and English as native tongues and learned elementary French in high school. In his free time, Khan enjoys hobbies like programming, photography, and travel.

September 2016 QASIG Video

Leading Change from the QA team

Most efforts to request or implement changes fail. They fail often enough that the “change curve” for organization change is derived from the grieving process when a loved-one dies. Shock, denial, anger, and fear are experienced before the organization starts accepting the change and committing to it. These change efforts fail somewhere between shock and fear.

Yet, the opportunity for change is large, especially when it comes to quality. We all know that preventing bugs is better than finding them. We also know that finding bugs earlier is better than finding them late. Since testing is often done late in the development cycle, when we want to drive a change it usually involves asking other teams to change their behavior.

In this session, I will show you a 4-step process for leading change, and illustrate the process with several examples of successful process changes that lead to better quality and testing. Included with the 4-step process will be a variety of tools which have proven very useful in influencing those teams outside of your direct control.

Session Takeaways:

  • Build the case for change.
  • Plan the change.
  • Test the change.
  • Rollout and make adjustments.

Included with each of these steps will be a number of tools, methods, and examples to successfully implement the change.

About our speaker: John Ruberto has been developing software in a variety of roles for 30 years. He has held positions ranging from development and test engineer to project, development, and quality manager. He has experience in Aerospace, Telecommunications, and Consumer software industries. Currently, he is a Director of Quality Engineering at Concur. He received a B.S. in Computer and Electrical Engineering from Purdue University, an M.S. in Computer Science from Washington University, and an MBA from San Jose State University.

May QASIG Meeting

MetaAutomation presented by: Matt Griscom

See Matt’s book on Amazon.com

Regression testing automation provides an important measure of product quality and can keep the quality moving forward.  Unfortunately, automation can take a long time to run, and automation failures generally must be debugged and triaged by the test automation team before any action item can be considered or communicated to the broader team.  The resulting time lag and uncertainty greatly reduces the value of the automation, and increases time cost and quality risk.

MetaAutomation is a language of five patterns that provides guidance to new and existing automation efforts, supplies fast and reliable regression testing of expected business behavior for a software solution, speeds quality communication around the team, and reduces latency and resource cost.

The five patterns, Atomic Check, User Pool, Parallel Run, Smart Retry and Automated Triage, form a sequence, representing an order in which the patterns would apply, and a network of dependencies from the more dependent to the less dependent patterns.

For an existing automation project, the least dependent pattern, Atomic Check, can be applied in whole or in part to run the automation faster and create results that are more actionable.  If enough of Atomic Check is followed, the dependent patterns can then be applied to further speed, direct and enhance the value of communications resulting from the automation.

About our speaker:  Matt Griscom has 20 years’ experience creating software including test automation, harnesses and frameworks.  Two degrees in physics primed him to seek the big picture in any setting.  This comprehensive vision periodically puts Matt in the vanguard.  Matt loves helping people solve problems with computers and IT.