Tag Archives: testing

May 2018 QASIG Meeting Video – Blockchain Overview and Discussion

Blockchain Overview Slide Deck

Blockchain Technology Overview and Discussion

Presented by Jim Frazier & Parke Blake, Quardev

Jim Frazier, one of Quardev’s Business Development Managers and self-confessed tech geek, and Parke Blake, Senior Test Lead, will provide a brief history of Blockchain technology: what it is, what it isn’t, where it is being used today and a discussion about where it might be going in the future.

Being firmly rooted in the technology sector, we at Quardev are always curious about exploring the latest trends in technology, and in finding solutions to help our clients leverage that technology to stay ahead in this rapidly changing environment, which is IT.

Please join us for a casual evening at our office for this month’s edition of the QASIG as we explore where Blockchain is today, and where it might be going tomorrow.

Details:

Blockchain technology is poised to disrupt the software industry as we’ve come to know it, and some go so far as to say, it will ultimately make for a bigger change than the Internet. These are the very early days in blockchain technology development, and the many ways in which it may be employed is as unknown to us today as the Internet was in the early Nineties. In this discussion, we’ll take a look at what blockchain technology provides, why it is important, and also provide an overview of how it works. We’ll also look at some interesting examples of how the technology is currently being employed, and hopefully, stimulate a discussion with the audience on what some key testing concerns might be.

There are few who can be called experts in blockchain technology, and we make no such claims, but we are excited to learn more about this important, emerging technology and happy to share what we’ve found so far. It is our hope that this talk will stimulate you to explore further on your own, and possibly, return one day with thoughts of your own.

About our speakers:

Parke is a software professional with over 25 years of experience in the industry. He has been recognized for strong problem solving and leadership skills in many areas of the software lifecycle, including programming, software testing, and QA Management. He has worked at Quardev for over 8 years, working as a Senior Test Lead and advising clients on several key projects. His work has included test planning, test case development, metrics analysis and reporting, and QA process recommendations. In addition, Parke has performed work as an SDET for Quardev, working on both front-end and back-end test case automation in C#, and using both standard and custom automation frameworks.

Jim is one of Quardev’s Business Development Managers and self-confessed tech geek and an 18-year veteran in supporting the IT Consulting Community in the Seattle market. He says that one of his favorite things about the industry is that he has been able to work with so many of the same clients year after year as their businesses have grown, all while keeping his eye on the latest trends and emerging technologies in this dynamic environment.

May QASIG Meeting

MetaAutomation presented by: Matt Griscom

See Matt’s book on Amazon.com

Regression testing automation provides an important measure of product quality and can keep the quality moving forward.  Unfortunately, automation can take a long time to run, and automation failures generally must be debugged and triaged by the test automation team before any action item can be considered or communicated to the broader team.  The resulting time lag and uncertainty greatly reduces the value of the automation, and increases time cost and quality risk.

MetaAutomation is a language of five patterns that provides guidance to new and existing automation efforts, supplies fast and reliable regression testing of expected business behavior for a software solution, speeds quality communication around the team, and reduces latency and resource cost.

The five patterns, Atomic Check, User Pool, Parallel Run, Smart Retry and Automated Triage, form a sequence, representing an order in which the patterns would apply, and a network of dependencies from the more dependent to the less dependent patterns.

For an existing automation project, the least dependent pattern, Atomic Check, can be applied in whole or in part to run the automation faster and create results that are more actionable.  If enough of Atomic Check is followed, the dependent patterns can then be applied to further speed, direct and enhance the value of communications resulting from the automation.

About our speaker:  Matt Griscom has 20 years’ experience creating software including test automation, harnesses and frameworks.  Two degrees in physics primed him to seek the big picture in any setting.  This comprehensive vision periodically puts Matt in the vanguard.  Matt loves helping people solve problems with computers and IT.

January 2015 QASIG Meeting

How Many Hammers Do I Need? Presented by Jeffrey Copeland

Nineteenth-century writer Thomas Carlyle noted “Man is a tool-using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.” Jeffrey Copeland has lately been considering the contrapositive: is someone with too many tools less effective? For our current purpose, the question becomes “how many tools do I need to do my job? how many tools is too many? when do my tools make my work harder?” In this talk Jeff will explore the history of some of our development tools, and think about what tools we need to cut ourselves out of the thicket.

About our speaker: Jeffrey Copeland has been building software not quite since the days of vacuum tubes, but remembers why it’s called “core memory.” He’s been a developer, project and program manager, and occasionally fallen into testing and test management, in environments from three-person startups to IBM and Microsoft, on three continents and in Texas. He’s currently running his own consultancy. He can be reached via jeffreycopeland.com.

November 2014 QASIG Meeting

Scientific Basis for Testing with Immediate Implications, Scott Gibson

This presentation addresses the core fundamentals of QA that are often misunderstood and misapplied. What is the purpose of software testing? How should testing professionals operate to achieve this purpose? A scientific approach to testing using the scientific method and empirical falsification will be presented with examples of how this approach will deliver higher quality products. Scott has presented versions of this approach for over 10 years to many companies and forums, and has required his teams to follow this approach in all of their testing. This proven approach is often a profound testing shift for many companies and testers.

About our speaker: Scott Gibson is currently the first Director of Software Quality at Amazon. His team is responsible for delivering Amazon’s high quality tablet and phone products. Scott has been an engineering leader for over 20 years at large companies and small start-ups. He has led software and hardware testing, software development, program management, and cutting edge research teams.

September 2014 QASIG Meeting

From Tester to Evangelist: Finding a calling in Live Site Quality, Jon Bach, eBay

In December 2010, Jon Bach felt at the top of his game when it came to testing projects at Quardev. As Manager for Corporate Intellect, his job was to inspire confidence that any client would be impressed at the array of ideas to find bugs and the speed at which they could be found. He felt like he could help clients get more from testing with Quardev than from any other company. He was famous for being a passionate tester who delighted in practicing ways to reveal weaknesses and vulnerabilities that mattered.

But a Voice beckoned. The Voice was eBay and it had things to teach Jon in its Silicon Valley headquarters. The offer was not one he could refuse – to change the world by improving an economic platform that enabled millions around the world to have a livelihood.

Not long after he started work, he went from Quality Manager of Search Front End to Director of Live Site Quality – making sure a vast array of existing bugs got fixed. Suddenly it wasn’t about testing and finding bugs, but driving an answer to “now what do we do?” This talk is about an idea that isn’t talked about much in testing – Customer Advocacy. This is his story of going from ardent treasure-hunter to customer ambassador and how that may affect the way you approach the pursuit of bugs.